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Welcome to the Sharemarket Game!

Help your students make the most out of the Sharemarket Game with the ASX platform, lesson plans and student worksheets.

Whether you’ve registered for the first time or you’re a seasoned participant, we hope your students have fun as they learn about the sharemarket and investing.

More support for teachers

In this page we guide you around the platform and provide a suggested weekly teaching plan that you can follow step by step or tailor to suit your needs. 

We include links to detailed lesson plans as well as student worksheets that can be filled in online. We also provide a range of ideas for classroom activities.

For more ideas, you can review How teachers integrate the Game into their lessons.

So let’s dive in – starting with the aims of the Game.

Aims of the Game

The Sharemarket Game is a fun and informative way for your students to learn about the sharemarket and investing. Each syndicate receives $50,000 in virtual cash to invest in the S&P/ASX200, some small and mid-cap companies, or a selection of Exchange-Traded Funds (ETFs). The winner is the student or team who finishes the game with the highest value portfolio.

The Game allows students to get first-hand experience of how the sharemarket works, learning valuable investing skills along the way. These include buying/selling shares and ETFs, researching companies, and using technical analysis to evaluate shares. They’ll also learn how the economy and worldwide events influence the market, and how to safeguard investments against risk through strategies like diversification.

Note that the Game has a short timeframe of ten weeks. This, and the fact that the money is only virtual, means your students can take more risks than they would if they were investing ‘for real’. For most people, investing in the sharemarket is a long-term proposition.

Week 1: Teacher resources

Getting around the platform and finding teacher resources

If your class hasn’t played the Sharemarket Game before, this is a good place to start. Go to the Sharemarket Game resources page and download the Getting started guide

Your students can use our online tutorial by going to the How to participate screen and clicking on the Game dashboard tutorial. The How to participate page is also where they can find student worksheets for each lesson. These PDF worksheets are now editable – so students can fill them in online then download them and send them to you.

Week 1: Lesson 1 - The Sharemarket Game


For new classes 

  1. Go to the Teacher resource page and click on Lesson plan
  2. Scroll down to Quickstart lesson 1 plan
  3. Download the teacher’s notes by clicking on Teachers QuickStart lesson 1: The ASX Schools Sharemarket Game


For experienced classes

If your class has already played the Sharemarket Game, here are some suggestions for other activities:

In groups, students discuss:

  • Some different goals for investing, depending on different life stages (eg, just out of school, first job, starting a family, retirement, etc).
  • Three things they’d like to invest for (either now or in the future).
  • What financial freedom means to them.


Week 1: Lesson 2 - Why and how to invest


Class activity 1:

Questions

1.- What is capital growth? 

2.- What are two types of investments that can provide an income?

3.- Name four things that a financial plan considers

4.- In a financial plan, what are needs? List three examples.

5.- Name at least one financial objective.

6.- True or false? Older people are generally in a better position to take financial risks than younger people.

7.- A market correction is a:

a) A type of investment product

b) A downturn in the market

c) Volatility

Answers

1. An increase in the value of your investment.

2. Any 2 of these: shares, property, fixed income products

3. Income, expenditure, investment and liabilities

4. Anything like these: food, rent, payment of tax, insurance and school fees

5. Tax minimisation, wealth accumulation, retirement

6. False. 

7. b.

Tip – Student journals

Keeping a journal can help your students record their investment process and observations about the market. It’s a good idea to start now during week 1 – so they can keep an ongoing record of how their thoughts and strategies evolve as they learn more. 

Get your students to keep a regular journal about what they’re learning in The Sharemarket Game, and their thoughts about investing over the 9 weeks. 

Class activity 2:

As well as recording their own thoughts, you can also get them to read and listen to financial reports to build up their understanding of how the market works and the impact of the economy on the market.
 

For new classes:

What did you learn about investing today? What would you like to learn in the next 10 weeks? 

Watch the ASX Daily Market Wrap on www2.asx.com.au three times this week and take notes, answering the questions:

  1. How did the ASX close today (up or down) and by what percentage?
  2. How many shares gained?
  3. What were the top gains and top decliners?
  4. What were the top sectors?
  5. What were the bottom sectors?
  6. How did the Australian dollar end the day compared to the US/GBP/Japanese Yen?


For experienced classes:

Read or watch 3 financial news reports throughout the news and take notes. 

  1. What was the topic?
  2. What were the main points of the report?
  3. Make a note of any new vocabulary and look up the meanings.

Week 2: Building investing skills

Week 2: Lesson 1

Getting ready to invest + risks and benefits of shares

  1. Go to the Teacher resource page
  2. Scroll down to Lesson 6: Getting ready to invest. You can download the student activity sheets on the right, and the teacher’s plans on the left.
  3. Focus on Share investment, Risk and Rewards on pages 3-9 on the student worksheets.

Week 2: Lesson 2

Getting ready to invest + Savigs and Investment goals

  1. Go to the Teacher resource page
  2. Scroll down to Lesson 6: Getting ready to invest. You can download the student activity sheets on the right, and the teacher’s plans on the left.
  3. Focus on pages 1-2 and 10-11 on the student worksheets.

Class activity 1 - Women and investing 

Discussion, reading and comprehension

Carmen, who played under the name Pilar, was one of the top women players in Game 1 of the 2021 public Sharemarket Game. We interviewed her about the experience and her strategies. 

Pre-reading activities

  1. What do you hope to get out of the Sharemarket Game?
  2. What strategy will you use to try and win?
  3. Research has found that more men than women invest in the sharemarket. Why do you think this is the case? 
     

FOLLOW-UP ACTIVITIES:

  1. Go to the Investopedia top female investors article and choose one of the female investors listed.
  2. Why are they well known?
  3. Did they face any particular obstacles – and if so, what were they?
  4. What have they contributed to the investment community?
  5. Investigate a well-known female investor from Asia-Pacific region. Write a 150 word biography on her achievements and investment journey.
  6. Research to find out:
    • The difference between the average earnings for Australian men and women
    • The difference between the average super savings of Australian men and women
    • The average life span of Australian men vs women
    • The average amount of unpaid work Australian women do in comparison to Australian men
  7. Present your findings in a graph.

Class activity 2 - Using the company list 

Students can use the company list to:

  • search for a company by name and code or sector
  • add stock to their watchlist, or remove them
  • choose the buy or sell button to go to the place an order page
  • view specific details about a company.

Review the Using the company list factsheet and practice searching for companies by name, sector and code.

Week 3: Game plan

Week 3: Lesson 1

Exploring the market

  1. Go to the Teacher resource page
  2. Scroll down to Lesson 5: The role of the Australian Securities Exchange (you’ll find teacher’s lesson plan on the left side of the screen and the students' activity sheets on the right).
  3. Follow the lesson plan.

Week 3: Lesson 2

Your game plan

  1. Go to the Teacher resource page
  2. Scroll down to Quickstart lesson 3: Your Game Plan (you’ll find teacher’s lesson plan on the left side of the screen and the students' activity sheets on the right)
  3. Follow the lesson plan.

Background on ETFs for teachers


Exchange-traded funds, better known as ETFs have been available in Australia for 20 years now. This is the second Schools Sharemarket Game that they’ve been available. They:
 

  • Allow investors to gain exposure to a huge range of companies – in just one trade.
  • Are similar to managed funds, in that your money is pooled with other investors – and the actual underlying shares or assets are owned by the ETF provider. 
  • Unlike managed funds, can be traded on the ASX – like shares.  
  • Are typically passively managed – so the fund manager tracks the performance of an index like the ASX200, fixed interest, or a commodity like gold or oil, rather than actively choosing the shares. 
  • Allow investors with a limited budget to gain exposure to a wide variety of shares – helping them build an investment portfolio faster.
  • Can allow investors to focus on themes like renewable energy or robotics, commodities, currencies or sectors.

To find the list of ETFs available in the Sharemarket Game, students go to their dashboard, click on Game play and choose Company list from the dropdown menu. Click the Search icon and type in ETF. 

Week 3: Lesson 3

Using ETFs

  1. Go to the Teacher resource page
  2. Scroll down to Game Video Tutorials for students (you’ll see these on the left side of the screen)
  3. Click on Video 5: What are ETFs?
  4. Watch twice – the first time through just listening. Then answer the questions and listen again to check.
    • True or false: Chris used ETFs when he was playing the Schools Sharemarket Game.
    • Why does Chris like ETFs?
    • What would Chris use ETFs for if he were playing the Sharemarket game now?

Answers

  1. False
  2. Allows you to gain exposure to hundreds of companies with just one trade rather than buying individually; great way to get exposure to particular thematic or area of the market.
  3. He’d look for ETFs that give you exposure to an area of the market that’s doing well (e.g., technology, mining) or geography (e.g., China).

Class activities

Investment gurus

Students choose an investment guru to research. It can be a famous one like Warren Buffett or George Soros, or an investor from outside the US, or a woman. Students should research to find out:

  • Why they are famous
  • Their investment philosophy
  • Their greatest achievements
  • Their attitude to risk
  • Their net wealth

Suggested prompts for student journals

  1. Go to the ASX web page 20 years of ETFs on ASX
  2. Scroll down to the heading Find out more about investing in ETFs
  3. Take notes on:
    • The features and risks and benefits of ETFs
    • The type of product types of ETFs
    • The differences between buying and selling ETFs and trading shares

Review the Investor Update special edition with articles from a range of ETF specialists.

Investment skills

Week 4: Company research

Week 4: Lesson 1

Researching a company + ASX indices and sectors

  1. Go to the Teacher resource page
  2. Scroll down to Quickstart lesson 2: Researching a company (you’ll find the teacher’s lesson plan on the left side of the screen and the students' activity sheets on the right)
  3. Do the ASX indices and sectors (pg S.1) as a whole class and Investigate Industry sectors (pg S.2) in small groups.

Week 4: Lesson 2

Researching a company + What to buy

  1. Go to the Teacher resource page
  2. Scroll down to Quickstart lesson 2: Researching a company (you’ll find the teacher’s lesson plan on the left side of the screen and the students' activity sheets on the right)
  3. Do the What to buy lesson (pg S3-S4). 

Class activity 1: End of Financial Year (EOFY) results and reporting season


Use the following information to explain reporting season:

  • EOFY is June 30 in Australia, and most publicly listed Australian companies report their full-year earnings results in August. Half-year results are generally released in February. 
  • To find out when a company releases its reports, check its investor website.
  • A few companies end their financial years in other months.
  • During Reporting Season, companies update the market on their performance. 
  • By law, companies listed on ASX must report their earnings, results and forecasts to shareholders. 
  • Most large companies also do calls with the media about their results.
  • These reports can be really useful to listen to as you can find out about trends in different industries and the economy as a whole.

Check students understand the words dividends, takeovers, and buybacks. Refer to the vocabulary activity further down in the newsletter.

Pre-listening task

Students go online to research, or discuss before listening:

  1. What sector do BHP and Woodside belong to?
  2. Name three commodities that Australia exports.
  3. Name three Australian mining companies.
  4. Who owns Bunnings?
  5. What factors do you think could be causing uncertainty on the Australian sharemarket over the last few months?
  6. What do you think? Choose from the following: In this reporting season, overall Australian companies:
    • underperformed
    • performed reasonably well
    • had standout performances.

Listening activity

Students listen to CommSec’s Reporting Season Wrap, and answer the questions: 

  1. True or false? Most companies gave really specific goals for the future.
  2. Which were the worst-performing stocks in August? 
  3. Which commodity doubled its price?
  4. Who tripled their dividends in this reporting season?
  5. What is happening with BHP and Woodside?
  6. Which companies saw their profits rise by 60%?
  7. Who owns Supercheap Auto and Rebel Sport?
  8. Why did Temple & Webster do so well?
  9. Choose one reason why A2 Milk’s profits fell 80%.
  10. Woolworths had a $__ buyback.
  11. How much did Flight Centre lose – and where are they recovering?
  12. Why did Ansell do so well in the pandemic?
  13. CSL has two businesses – which one didn’t do so well?
  14. Why did Wisetech rise?
  15. Why did Afterpay’s shares rise?

Answers

  1. False
  2. Iron ore stocks
  3. Iron ore
  4. BHP and Rio (Tinto)
  5. They merged oil and gas assets and become a giant energy group
  6. Harvey Norman and JB Hi-Fi
  7. Super Retail Group
  8. An online retailer that just sells furniture
  9. Any of these answers: lower birth rate in China (so drop in demand) international borders closed, competition from Chinese infant formula brands
  10. Woolworths had a $2 billion buyback.
  11. Flight Centre lost $500 million but had  growth and recovery in US, Canada and Europe
  12. The demand for PPE – masks and gloves
  13. Blood products (issues collecting plasma)
  14. Wisetech released its profit results which showed it had a lift in profit and revenue, and flagged a bigger profit in 2022
  15. After US payment Square launched a takeover for company.

Follow up activity

Students scroll down the list of companies on the CommSec Reporting Season page and choose 2 company reports to listen to.

They listen and take notes, then either produce a written summary for the two companies or make a slide presentation and do a short verbal presentation in class (they can work in pairs to do this).

Investment skills

Week 5: Understanding internal and external influences on investing

Week 5: Lesson 1

The economy and the sharemarket

  1. Go to the Teacher resource page
  2. Scroll down to Teachers supplementary lesson 3: Impact of the economy and global events (you’ll find the teacher’s lesson plan on the left side of the screen and the students' activity sheets on the right)
  3. Review the Interest rates, government policies / actions, and commodity prices section.

Week 5: Lesson 2

The economy and the sharemarket

  1. Go to the Teacher resource page
  2. Scroll down to Teachers supplementary lesson 3: Impact of the economy and global events (you’ll find the teacher’s lesson plan on the left side of the screen and the students' activity sheets on the right)
  3. Review the exchange rates, other financial markets and economies, and corporate actions section.

Class activity 1: Key vocabulary

(do this after completing Lesson 2, above)

The sharemarket has its own ‘language’ or investing terms. Understanding them will help take the mystery out of investing in shares. Encourage students to keep a list of new marketing terms in their journals. In this matching definition exercise, students work in pairs or groups to match the words with the meaning:

1. All Ordinaries (All Ords)

2. emerging markets 

3. blue-chip companies 

4. buyback

5. bear market

6. bull market

7. corporate actions 

8. dividends

9. monetary policy

10. small cap

11. takeover

a. When a company buys its own outstanding shares, to reduce the number of shares available in the open market.

b. Regular payments (often annually) by a company to its shareholders from its profits.

c. Taking a controlling interest in a company by buying their shares.

d. When share prices are generally falling.

e. A large, reliable company with a good reputation.

f. A company with about $300 million to $2 billion in market capitalisation (the number of shares multiplied by the present share price).

g. When share prices generally are rising.

h. The share prices of around 500 of the largest Australian companies.

i. The economy of a developing nation that is becoming more integrated with global markets as it grows.

j. Any activity that changes an organisation, affecting its stakeholders (including shareholders).

k. The rules of a nation’s central bank that control the supply for money to a nation’s banks, consumers and businesses.

Answers

1. h / 2. i / 3. e / 4. a / 5. d / 6. g / 7. j / 8. b / 9. k / 10. f / 11. c

Crossword - vocabulary

  1. Go to https://crosswordlabs.com/view/sharemarket-words 
  2. Complete the crossword – either as a homework task or in pairs or groups as a class activity.
  3. Click here for the solutions. 

Investment skills: Using EFTs to invest in sectors or themes

For more background on ETFs, see Using ETFs from our Building investment skills newsletter


Background on ETFs for teachers

Exchange-traded funds, better known as ETFs, have been available in Australia for 20 years now. This is the second Schools Sharemarket Game that they’ve been available.

ETFs:

  • Allow investors to gain exposure to a huge range of companies – in just one trade.
  • Are similar to managed funds, in that your money is pooled with other investors – and the actual underlying shares or assets are owned by the ETF provider. 
  • Unlike managed funds, can be traded on the ASX – like shares.  
  • Are typically passively managed – so the fund manager tracks the performance of an index like the ASX200, fixed interest, or a commodity like gold or oil.
  • Allow investors with a limited budget to gain exposure to a wide variety of shares – helping them build an investment portfolio faster.
  • Can allow investors to focus on themes like renewable energy or robotics, commodities, currencies or sectors.


Using the watchlist to find ETFs

  1. Explain to students:
    • A sector ETF invests most or all of its assets in one particular industrial sector. (Brainstorm from students the kinds of sectors that it could invest in e.g. energy, materials, consumer discretionary etc) (You can check here for the ASX Sector list).
    • A thematic ETF invests in a particular trend within the economy, e.g. Environmental Social Governance (ESG) responsible/ethical/sustainable investing, robotics and automation, healthcare, artificial intelligence.  
    • Sector or theme funds can help you diversify your portfolio, or potentially make the most of opportunities in a sector that’s doing particularly well.
  2. From the dashboard, students click on Game play in the blue row on top of the page, then choose Company list from the dropdown menu. Type in ETF in the search box. Students can then click on different ETFs to see if they invest in specific themes or sectors. They can also see charts to track how well this specific ETF has been performing.

Holiday research project

  • Go to the Teacher resource page and download the Student Supplementary Lesson 4: History – booms and busts.
  • Students choose to research then present on one particular cycle of market: The Wall Street crash of 1929, the crash of 1987, the dot-com bubble, the GFC and the credit crunch.
  • As well as using the information in the worksheets, students find two other sources of information about their particular market cycle to inform their research.
  • When students return to school they can do a short presentation on their particular area, focusing on one aspect of the event – such as the boom (before the bust), the lead-up to the bust and its causes, the bust (what happened and how much was lost), or the recovery.

Week 6: Managing risk

Week 6: Lesson 1

Managing risk

  1. Go to the Teacher resource page
  2. Scroll down to Quickstart lesson 2: Managing Risk – diversification and sectors. 
  3. You can download the student activity sheets on the right, and the teacher plans on the left.
  4. Follow the lesson plan and complete the student activities.

Week 6: Lesson 2

Investment skills – Using ETFs to diversify your portfolio

One of the advantages of ETFs is that they can provide exposure to a range of companies, sectors, geographies, investment classes and themes in just one trade, making it a simple and cost-effective way to diversify your portfolio.

In the Sharemarket Game, ETFs can be used to diversify and also to gain maximum exposure to an area of the market that is doing particularly well. For example, if technology or renewable energy or a region such as Asia is performing well, you could invest in an ETF that focuses on that particular theme or geography, giving your portfolio more exposure to a growth area.

Class activity 1: Market volatility


Make sure your students understand these key terms: bonds, fixed interest and commodities. 

Pre-listening discussion with partner or in groups:

  • Why do you think there was so much volatility across markets in February 2020?

  • Why is diversification important during times of market volatility?


Then ask your students to watch this video and take notes.

Jessica Amir (from online brokerage company Bell Direct) interviews Chris Bryki, CEO and founder of online fund manager, Stockspot. The interview took place in February 2020.

 

Investment skills

Students search for specific ETFs in teams. The first team to finish correctly is the winner.

  1. Log into the Sharemarket Game 
  2. Click on the drop-down menu on the left hand of the blue ribbon along the top of the page
  3. Click on Company list
  4. Type in ETF in the search box

Find an ETF that allows you to invest in:

  1. international shares
  2. the Australian resource sector
  3. global healthcare
  4. an Asian country
  5. cybersecurity
  6. batteries
  7. bonds
  8. gold
  9. robotics
  10. sustainable shares in Australia

Answers

  1. Vanguard MSCI Index International Shares ETF
  2. BetaShares Australian Resources Sector ETF
  3. iShares Global Healthcare ETF
  4. (any of the following) BetaShares Asia Technology Tigers ETF; VanEck China New Economy ETF; iShares MSCI Japan ETF, iShares MSCI South Korea ETF
  5. BetaShares Global Cybersecurity ETF
  6. ETFS battery tech and lithium ETF
  7. iShares Core Composite Bond ETF bonds
  8. VanEck Gold Miners ETF 
  9. ETFS Robo Global Robotics And Automation ETF 
  10. BetaShares Global Sustainability Leaders ETF

Follow up activity: Journalling

In your journal, choose one specific sector, region or theme that you’re interested in that is covered by an ETF in the sharemarket game (eg, healthcare, China or robotics). Set up a Google alert for news articles on the topic. Take notes on development in that sector, region or theme to build your understanding of the area.
 

Holiday research project: presentation

If your students completed the holiday research project Student Supplementary Lesson 4: History – booms and busts (see teachers resources page), now is the time for them to present their findings to the class or in small groups.

Before the presentation, get your students to come up with a few questions about one of the areas that they didn’t study, to ask the student at the end of their presentation. This can help ensure your students are engaged with each presentation.

Week 7: Using charts

Week 7: Lesson 1

Company quest

The Company Quest is an exercise to help students become more familiar with some of the terminology they may come across when researching on the ASX website and other financial resources.
  1. Go to: The company quest activity 
  2. Follow the worksheet instructions. 

Week 7: Lesson 2

Using charts

  1. Go to the Teacher resource page
  2. Scroll down to Quickstart lesson 2: Using the ASX charts 
  3. You can download the student activity sheets on the right, and the teacher’s plans on the left.
  4. Follow the lesson plan and complete the student activities.

Class activity 1

Review the following concepts and words with your students, then complete the cloze activity below.

dollar cost averaging A strategy where an investor buys a fixed dollar amount of shares at regular intervals, regardless of the price. When prices are high, they can only afford a certain number of assets, but as the price falls they can afford more.
ask When a trader offers their shares for sale at a certain price.
bid When a trader in the market makes an offer to buy shares.
trading volume The number of shares being traded in a specific period of time.
market capitalisation (also called market cap) The total value of all a company's shares.
day trading The practice of entering and exiting stock trades within a single day - for example, buying a stock in the morning and selling it in the afternoon for a profit.
execute a trade To fulfill a stock trading order eg, to buy 100 shares of a company.
rally When a stock price rises at a notably faster pace
earnings per share (EPS) An investment metric to estimate a company's value by dividing its net income by its total number of outstanding shares.
bid-ask spread The difference between the highest price at which someone is willing to buy shares and the lowest price someone is willing to sell shares.

Complete the cloze


1. At close of business on 29 September, Telstra had a __________________________ of $46.9 billion.

2. Apple stocks __________________________ today as the tech giant introduced its latest iPhone.

3. __________________________ is a stressful and risky way to earn a living, as there is a high chance of losing all your money.  

4. When you __________________________, you invest equal dollar amounts at regular intervals. So instead of attempting to time the market, you buy in at a range of different prices.

5. The __________________________ price is the lowest price a seller will accept for a share. 

6. The __________________________ price is the maximum price that a buyer is willing to pay for a share of stock or other security.

7. You can __________________________ through an online brokerage or through a stockbroker.

8. The __________________________ represents the demand and supply of stocks.

9. Generally, a share’s __________________________ gets higher when its price is changing – because there are more buyers and sellers in the market for those shares.

10. A company’s __________________________ shows how much money a company makes for each share of its stock.

Week 8: Lessons for real-life investing

As we’ve discussed before, the Sharemarket Game has a very short timeframe. To win it, most people take more risks than they normally would if they were investing with real money. That’s because the sharemarket is typically a long-term investment. In general, by riding out short term volatility, investors tend to enjoy more favourable returns from the sharemarket compared with other asset classes.

But while the strategy for the Game might differ from real life, the Game is still full of practical skills that investors use every day. All the information we’ve covered in our lessons can help your students become better informed and wiser investors, including:

  • The importance of having an investment strategy
  • Understanding the benefits and risks of shares
  • Learning how to manage risk
  • Understanding the impact of social, political and economic trends on the sharemarket
  • Researching a company
  • Understanding market indices and sectors
  • How to place orders and how to sell shares and ETFs on ASX
  • Fundamental analysis
  • Understanding how ETFs work
  • Using charting tools
  • Using watchlists
  • Learning sharemarket terminology

Follow-up activity 1: Silent Auction

A great way to teach your class about the impact of supply and demand on the market is by creating a Silent Auction. 

Follow the worksheet instructions.  

Follow-up activity 2: Vocabulary games

Word/terminology search

Find words or terms related to the sharemarket or the economy either horizontally, vertically or diagonally.

To use the wordsearch, either:

  • Put the students into pairs or groups. 
  • Set a time limit.
  • The pair or group with the most correct answers at the end of the time limit are the winners.

Or: 

  • Provide students with the word list.
  • Students work alone to find the words, crossing the words off the list as the find them.

Word list:

ASX, materials, ATO, bear, bull, buyback, diversify, dividends, economic, interest, order, price, sectors, spread, takeover, tax, volatility, watchlist

Comprehension check

Students can complete these alone, in pairs or in groups. For more advanced classes they need to attempt them without referring to notes or the internet.

  1. Explain the difference between a bull and a bear market.
  2. True or false? Woolworths, Coles, Telstra and BHP are examples of blue chip companies.
  3. Finish the sentence: Companies that pay out ___________________________ are generally a popular choice for investors seeking income.
  4. Choose the correct answer: A buyback is when a company:
    • (a) Buys shares from competitor companies
    • (b) Re-buys some of its shares from existing shareholders
    • (c) Buys back property that it sold in the last 10 years.
  5. Label each feature as either day trading (DT) or investing (I):
    • A time horizon of more than a year.
    • Intention to buy or sell a stock at a particular price.
    • Intention to hold a share while it gains value.
    • Hold a share for one day.
  6. The gap between the bid and the ask prices of a share is called the ________________.
  7. The fundamentals of a stock are the data that affect the price or expected value of a share. List at least 3 examples of a share’s fundamentals.
  8. List at least 3 Australian companies that belong in the Materials sector.
  9. List 3 ways you can diversify your portfolio:
  10. True or false? An emerging market is the same as a developed market.
  11. Choose the correct answer. To work out a company’s earnings per share (EPS) you:
    • (a) minus a company’s share price from its net profit.
    • (b) divide a company's net profit by the number of outstanding shares.
    • (c) add a company’s net profit to the value of its outstanding shares.
  12. True or false? A takeover can be done by buying a majority of shares in a firm, or through a mergers and acquisition (M&A) process.

Other ideas

You can create your own sharemarket vocabulary games and tasks using the ASX glossary.

Important information

Information provided is for educational purposes and does not constitute financial product advice.

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